CONTACT

Fleet Street Clinic
29 Fleet Street
London
EC4Y 1AA

OPENING TIMES
  • Monday 8:45 am - 8:00 pm
  • Tuesday 8:45 am - 8:00 pm
  • Wednesday 8:45 am - 8:00 pm
  • Thursday 8:45 am - 8:00 pm
  • Friday 8:45 am - 5:30 pm
Altitude Calculator

Find the altitude of every location on your travel itinerary and create a Profile to show the results in a simple graphic format.

DVT Calculator

Calculate an estimate of your own risk of flight-related Deep Vein Thrombosis.

Jet Lag Calculator

The Jet Lag Calculator can tell you how long it will take you to adjust to your new time zone when you travel – and to adjust back again when you come home.

Regional Information

Fleet Street Travel Clinic

Fleet Street Travel Clinic is a central London clinic with a special focus on Travel Medicine. The clinic has been established for over 20 years and is led by Dr Richard Dawood, an expert in Travel Health and author of the bestselling “Travellers’ Health: How to Stay Healthy Abroad”.

Whatever your travel needs; whether you’re looking for the hard-to-find yellow fever vaccination, or need some general medical advice on staying healthy abroad, Fleet Street Clinic can help. Call us today on 0207 353 5678 or email us at info@fleetstreetclinic.com

Regional Travel Vaccine Information 

(For prices, visit our travel vaccine page)

Europe

  • Update your protection against tetanus/diphtheria/polio; if more than ten years since your last booster, have one now.
  • If you are travelling to southern or eastern Europe, and especially if you will be swimming or diving in the Mediterranean, protection against hepatitis A may be worthwhile.
  • Hepatitis A vaccines provide long-term protection — at least 25 years. The vaccine should ideally be given at least 2 weeks before travel; the initial dose provides protection for at least one year; a second dose is needed for long-term protection, this should usually be given 6 and 12 months later. A combined injection of hepatitis A and typhoid vaccines is available.
  • If you will be walking or hiking in central, eastern and southern Europe, you may be at risk from tick-borne encephalitis, a viral infection spread by ticks; vaccination may be advisable.
  • Upper respiratory infection is more likely when you travel – so don’t miss out on your flu jab each year.
  • Travel with a medical kit containing common medicines.

Caribbean

  • Protection against tetanus/diphtheria/polio is highly recommended; if more than ten years since your last booster,  have one now.
  • Protection against typhoid may also advisable. The injected typhoid vaccine causes little reaction and is given as a single dose.
  • Hepatitis A vaccines provide long-term protection — at least 25 years. The vaccine should ideally be given at least 2 weeks before travel; the initial dose provides protection for at least one year; a second dose is needed for long-term protection, and this should usually be given 6 and 12 months later. A combined injection of hepatitis A and typhoid vaccines is available.
  • The drinkable cholera vaccine (Dukoral) – which also gives some protection from travellers’ diarrhoea – may be suitable for some travellers. It is strongly recommended for travel to Haiti and/or the Dominican Republic.
  • Malaria medication is only necessary for travel to Haiti and the Dominican Republic.
  • Dengue, chikungunya, and Zika are insect-borne viruses that are now established in the region and may be transmitted in most parts of the Caribbean. A dengue vaccine is available for long-term residents, but it is not sufficiently effective to be of value to short-term visitors. No vaccines are available against chikungunya or Zika, but insect repellents and other anti-insect measures will considerably reduce the risk of becoming infected. Zika virus infection during pregnancy may lead to birth defects; and Zika may also behave as a blood-borne virus, with the possibility of sexual transmission. Additional precautions and up-to-date individual advice are therefore essential – please ask us for further information.
  • We also advise you to travel with a medical kit containing items that may not easily be available at your destination.

Central & South America

  • Protection against tetanus/diphtheria/polio is highly recommended; if it is more than ten years since your last booster, you should have one now.
  • Protection against typhoid may also be advisable. The injected typhoid vaccine causes very little reaction and is given as a single dose.
  • Hepatitis A vaccines provide long-term protection — at least 25 years. The vaccine should ideally be given at least 2 weeks before travel; the initial dose provides protection for at least one year; a second dose is needed for long-term protection, and this should usually be given 6 and 12 months later. A combined injection of hepatitis A and typhoid vaccines is available.
  • You may need a yellow fever vaccination as a condition of entry; please give us your full itinerary including any transit points and onward destinations, so that we can advise you. You may also need a vaccination for your own protection, particularly in the Amazon and Orinoco basins, and in regions that may not have a formal requirement for vaccination. There have been recent deaths from yellow fever in visitors.
  • Protection against rabies may also be a sensible precaution, because dog and animal bites are common in travellers, and because safe vaccines and good medical treatment may not be easily available at your destination.
  • For longer-term or frequent visitors, hepatitis B should be considered.
  • The drinkable cholera vaccine (Dukoral) – which also gives some protection from travellers’ diarrhoea – may be suitable for some travellers.
  • Malaria medication and careful anti-insect measures are essential for most destinations.
  • Dengue, chikungunya and Zika are insect-borne viruses that are now established in the region. A dengue vaccine is available for long-term residents, but it is not sufficiently effective to be of value to short-term visitors. No vaccines are available against chikungunya or Zika, but insect repellents and other anti-insect measures will considerably reduce the risk of becoming infected. Zika virus infection during pregnancy may lead to birth defects; and Zika may also behave as a blood-borne virus, with the possibility of sexual transmission. Additional precautions and up-to-date individual advice are therefore essential – please ask us for further information.
  • We also advise you to travel with a medical kit containing items that may not easily be available at your destination.

Asia

  • Protection against tetanus/diphtheria and polio is highly recommended; if it is more than ten years since your last booster, you should have one now.
  • Protection against typhoid is also advisable. The injected typhoid vaccine causes little reaction and is given as a single dose.
  • Hepatitis A vaccines provide long-term protection — at least 25 years. The vaccine should ideally be given at least 2 weeks before travel; the initial dose provides protection for at least one year; a second dose is needed for long-term protection, and this should usually be given 6 and 12 months later. A combined injection of hepatitis A and typhoid vaccines is available.
  • Protection against rabies may also be a sensible precaution, because dog and animal bites are common in travellers, and because safe vaccines and good medical treatment may not be easily available at your destination.
  • Meningitis vaccination may be advisable for parts of India and Nepal.
  • You may need a yellow fever vaccination certificate if you are arriving in Asia directly from an infected region of Africa or South America.
  • Protection against Japanese encephalitis may be advisable for travellers to rural parts of Asia: please ask us for details.
  • For longer-term or frequent visitors, hepatitis B vaccination should be considered.
  • The drinkable cholera vaccine (Dukoral) – which also gives some protection from travellers’ diarrhoea – may be suitable for some travellers.
  • Malaria medication is not advised for some areas of Thailand such as Bangkok, Chiang Mai, Phuket and the other islands in the region; Singapore; Hong Kong; and Bali. It is present in many other parts of Asia, however, and malaria medication and careful anti-insect measures are essential for many other destinations in the region. Depending upon where you are going, there may be a high risk of food- and water-borne infection.
  • Dengue, chikungunya are insect-borne viruses that are now established in the region. A dengue vaccine is available for long-term residents, but it is not sufficiently effective to be of value to short-term visitors.
  • Zika is a growing risk and has become established in Singapore. Please check for latest information on its presence in Asia.
  • No vaccines are available against chikungunya or Zika, but insect repellents and other anti-insect measures will considerably reduce the risk of becoming infected.
  • Zika virus infection during pregnancy may lead to birth defects; and Zika may also behave as a blood-borne virus, with the possibility of sexual transmission. Additional precautions and up-to-date individual advice are therefore essential – please ask us for further information.
  • We also advise you to travel with a medical kit containing items that may not easily be available at your destination.

Africa

  • Protection against tetanus/diphtheria and polio is highly recommended; if it is more than ten years since your last booster, you should have one now.
  • Protection against typhoid is also advisable. The injected typhoid vaccine causes very little reaction and is given as a single dose.
  • Hepatitis A vaccines provide long-term protection — at least 25 years. The vaccine should ideally be given at least 2 weeks before travel; the initial dose provides protection for at least one year; a second dose is needed for long-term protection, and this should usually be given 6 and 12 months later. A combined injection of hepatitis A and typhoid vaccines is available.
  • You may need a yellow fever vaccination as a condition of entry; please give us your full itinerary including any transit points and onward destination, so that we can advise you. You may also need a vaccination for your own protection in a country with no formal requirement for vaccination.
  • Protection against meningitis is advisable for travellers to countries in the Sahel – the region just south of the Sahara; and to parts of East and Central Africa.
  • Protection against rabies may be a sensible precaution as dog and animal bites are common in travellers, and as safe vaccines and good medical treatment may not be easily available at your destination.
  • For longer-term or frequent visitors, hepatitis B should be considered.
  • The drinkable cholera vaccine (Dukoral) – which also gives some protection from travellers’ diarrhoea – may be suitable for some.
  • Malaria medication and careful anti-insect measures are essential to most destinations.
  • Dengue and chikungunya are insect-borne viruses that may cause infection. A dengue vaccine is available for long-term residents, but it is not sufficiently effective to be of value to short-term visitors. No vaccines are available against chikungunya, but insect repellents and other anti-insect measures will considerably reduce the risk of becoming infected. Please ask us for further information.
  • We advise you to travel with a medical kit containing items that may not easily be available at your destination.

To Book With Fleet Street Clinic

To book your vaccines, call 0207 353 5678 email info@fleetstreetclinic.com or request an appointment online here

Fleet Street Clinic is located at 29 Fleet Street, London EC4Y 1AA

Read more about our Travel Clinic Services 

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